Thursday, April 23, 2009

Migration Updates and Eastern Phoebe Webcam

Posted by Kirk Mona
The chimney swift migration pushes ever onward and upwards. Chimney Swifts have now been reported in Missouri and Illinois. You can track the migration at the Driftwood Wildlife Association Chimney Swift Migration website.

Another migration website to keep an eye on is the Ruby-throated hummingbird migration over at migration.net. I was pretty shocked to see that there are reports already of hummingbirds in Minnesota and up into Canada! Clearly though, the mass of birds is keeping to the south and east. Follow the migration here.

The 2009 Phoebe Cam is now officially up and running and the feed is available to the public. The Lee & Rose Warner Nature Center where Paul and I both work is a partner with the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology on the Nest Camera project. Live images from our Eastern Phoebe nest are sent out around the world via the Cornell Nest Cam website.

Here is a live image from the nest. The blog automatically uploads the most recent image when you land here so to see the next image taken you'll have to refresh the browser window or go directly to our bird's page at Cornell. New photos are uploaded every 20 seconds on that page and you can leave comments in the forum about what you are seeing. You can also show the camera in self-refreshing Pop-up that you can leave on your desktop.



This is the same nest site used last year. A tornado came though last memorial day with 110 mph straight line winds and while the web feed went down because of a power failure, when it came back up in the morning all the birds on the nest were safe so this is a proven good location to build a nest. We keep the nest up each year and the birds re-use it. Enjoy!

~Kirk

2 comments:

Pete said...

Hopefully, the hummingbirds will migrate closer to my home this year. Do you use feeders to attract hummingbirds to your yard? I'm looking for some and came across Perky-Pet's Top Fill feeders so far. Have you heard of these? They are extremely easy to fill.

Kirk Mona said...

Pete- We use feeders at the nature center where I work and get hummingbirds but I do not use them at home as there are a lot of hornets in my neighborhood and the feeders I have tried attract more hornets than hummers. I have not tried a top fill feeder but it sounds easier in principle.